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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
jackson, jr., lived off his campaign war chest. we'll bring you that right after the break. d. now find the most hard core driver in america. that guy, put him in it. what's this? [ male announcer ] tell him he's about to find out. you're about to find out. [ male announcer ] test it. highlight the european chassis, 6 speed manual, dual exhaust, wide stance, clean lines, have him floor it, spin it, punch it, drift it, put it through its paces, is he ppy? oha, he's happy! male aouncer ] and that's how you test your car for fun. easy. a hairline fracture to the mandible and contusions to the metacarpus. what do you see? um, i see a duck. be more specific. i see the aflac duck. i see the aflac duck out of work and not making any money. i see him moving in with his parents and selling bootleg dvds out of the back of a van. dude, that's your life. remember, aflac will give him cash to help cover his rent, car payments and keep everything as normal as possible. i see lunch. [ monitor beeping ] let's move on. [ male announcer ] find out what a hospital stay could really cost you at aflac.com.
in the direction of jackson, alabama. >> you're actually watching the video. i want to pause so we can listen to it as well. >> just to get a sense, john, this is something you do all the time? >> this is something i've done professionally for 12 years. i tell the general public, if you want to know what a toefrntd sounds like, go 80 miles an hour and stick your head out the window. this tornado was eye lot larger. >> oh, my god. i've never seen -- >> john, thank you so much. and for sharing those amazing pictures with us as well. we know you'll keep an eye on things. what are we looking at now. these are bands of storms that move through the area. is there still a threat? >> slight threat here of rotation. we have watches in effect right now. the whole area has calmed down significantly and turned into a wind damage event. we'll keep watching it. right through alabama in the past 15 minutes we have big windses rolling on through. that's that band that's moving down just into northwestern florida. there are still storms back out here. we're not worried so much about the storm as that line up
in the direction of jackson, alabama. >> i want to pause for a moment so we can listen to it as well. this is something you do all the time but we don't get to ride along with the tomorrow chaser. >> this is something i've done professionally for the last 12 years. i've had a pet peeve when people say it sounded like a freight train. i say if you want to know what a tornado sounds like go about 80 miles per hour down the interstate and stick your head out. it's that rushing sound. this tornado is a lot larger. >> oh, my god. >> thank you so much. and for sharing those amazing pictures with us. chad, what are we looking at now because these are bands of storms that move through the areas. are they still a threat? >> slight threat still of reatir rotation. we had some really big winds rolling on through through enterprise and the south there. we're worried about the storms. that's the cell right through hattiesburg. see how that red is all by itself. that turns into the big dog. it turns into the rotating super cell and that's what went right through west hattiesburg. >> thank you. all
, alabama in the direction of jackson, alabama. >> john, we're actually watching your video. i want to pause for a moment just so we can listen to it as well. just so you get a sense there, john. this is something you do all time, actually. but certainly we don't get to ride along with a storm chaser. >> this is something i've done professionally for the last 12 years. i have a pet peeve when people say it sounds like a freight train. i like to tell the general public, if you want to know what a tornado sounds like, go about 80 miles an hour down the interstate and stick your head out the window. you have that raw wind blowing sound, that rushing sound. i was in mobile for the christmas day tornado. this tornado was a lot larger. >> john sibley, thank you so much for sharing those amazing pictures with us as well. chad, what are we looking at now? these are bands of storms that moved through the area. is there still a threat? >> there's slight threat here still of rotation. we have watches in effect right now. the whole area has calmed down significantly and turned into a wind damage event.
. andrew jackson basically ended its charter. there's a long history of mistrust in parts of the united states about the central bank and what it does. back in the derickson and hamilton days, a lot of the farm state bankers did not trust the first bank of the united states. -- back in the days of jefferson and hamilton. there is a federal reserve board in washington made up of seven governors and chairman who is ben bernanke. then there are 12 regional fed banks. they're all part of this federal reserve system. the regional fed bank, every chartered bank of the united states has to pay in capital to the federal reserve banks and in return they get a dividend. but these are not banks the way we think of commercial banks. the federal reserve bank of new york is not like citigroup out there trying to earn big profits to return to shareholders. their job is to manage the money supply. it is also to be a lender of last resort in a crisis, which is what the federal reserve did in 2007. when there is a run on a bank, when depositors flee the banking system because they are scared their money
, for example in mississippi at the moment, it is a fight over that now one little pink building in jackson, some. . where they're using every single policy they can to close where it will be fashionably illegal to close one. but the other thing for mississippi, for women of color and poor women of disabilities was the ability to in fact have children. to not have the state forcibly and coercefully stair liez them. it was not that there was any win in mississippi. it was when mississippi defeated the personhood amendment because it got women who were interested on ivf and other women interested in the right to choose. i guess, we have already lost roe. we're in a pre-roe world where you can get abortions in other states, in other areas. that was true before roe. so we have lost that. and the real question is whether or not we can develop a more expansive definition of what constitution a reproductive rights movement. >> but it's always been reproductive freedom as a phrase. reproductive always meant the freedom to have children as well as not to have children. the focus, i think, on abortio
quinones, the vice chair is billbynum from jackson, mississippi. gary of coastaacosta is a foundr of the hispanic real estate professionals. don baylor is a senior policy analyst at the center for public policy priorities in austin, texas. mike brown is the executive developer of housing in oakland california. steve alston is the head of business development in mountain view, california. laura cortez is vice president for alternative financial solutions in omaha, nebraska. elizabeth is the director for consumer and state affairs at the aarp public policy institute in virginia. the associate professor of law at the university of minnesota in minneapolis. patricia is the president and executive director for pennsylvania. patricia is the director of never housing services in phoenix, arizona. adam is a visiting professor of law at harvard law school. james mccarty is the president and ceo of the miami fair housing center in dayton, ohio. jennifer is deputy director in washington, d.c. william jefferson from radcliff, ky. michelle is the global consumer cheap marketing and internet of
jackson, mississippi. jason, republican caller. caller: thank you. there is a couple of really somewhat offensive and i think -- i need further explanation and so do the listeners. the claim was stated moments ago about title v and saying it is clearly needed. an example is, for instance, more than 50% of white voters in mississippi voted for president obama. that is a fallacy. the claim does not support the supposition. what is the proof, then, without the biases? to understand the nature of political bias? from these claims, the heritage fellow stated, real claims against alabama have not been present or credible. so i don't understand why it's sort of makes me think i am listening to a radio show from 1950 when in fact it is 2013. host: we go to mr. berman for a response to that. guest: in 2001 it was a majority black town in mississippi. but the governing board, the mayor, and the city council were all white. in 2001 when there was going to be elections and it was clear that black voters were going to be able to win seats in that election, the government canceled the election becaus
american politics." let's hear from jackson, mississippi, jason, republican caller. caller: thank you. there was a couple of really somewhat offensive and i think probably logical fallacies that occurred and i need further explanation so do the listeners. when the claim was state add few moments ago about the title 5 in saying that it's, quote, clearly needed, an example of that, for instance, more than 50% of white voters in mississippi voted for president obama. that's a logical fallacy. the claim doesn't support the supposition. the question would really be, what is the proof then without sort of the biases, the nature of political bias, for these claims. the heritage fellow stated that real claims are against, for instance, alabama, haven't been present or credible. i really don't understand why it's sort of making me feel like i'm listening to a radio show from the 1950's when in fact it was 2013. host: mr. berman for a response. guest: you look for example at a town in mississippi, in 2001 it was a majority black town. but the governing board, the mayor and city council, was all
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)